Bennett's Wallaby

Bennett's Wallaby


Wallaby
Class: Mammalia
Order: Diprotodontia
Family: Macropodidae
Taxonomic Name: Macropus rufogriseus
 
Range: Throughout Eastern Australia, Tasmania, and on many of the Bass Strait Islands.
  
Habitat: They are found in many different environments including open areas, brush areas, rocky outcroppings and forests.
 
Physical Characteristics: The Bennett's Wallaby reaches a height of about 24 to 30 inches and weighs between 30 and 40 pounds. The males tend to be larger than the females. They are a brownish gray in color with a lighter underside. 
 
Longevity: 12- 15 years
 
Social Structure: Bennett's Wallabies are a social animal in nature and live in groups called mobs.  Multiple females may live together in a mob, with usually a single adult male.
 
Active Time: Mainly active around dawn and dusk (crepuscular)
 
Diet:    Wild grasses, roots, shoots, leaves
 
Behavior: As prey animals, wallabies stay ever-alert while grazing.  If threatened, a wallaby can flee at speeds up to 30 mph in short bursts.  They use their long tail as a counterbalance as they hop. 

  
Reproduction:   The Bennett's Wallaby, like the kangaroo and other members of the marsupial family, rear their young in pouches. 
They have a short average gestation period of about 30 days and bear live young, which make their way to the pouch and attach themselves to the mother's nipple for several months. The young are referred to as a joey. After this period, the joey begins to peek out of the pouch with their head. At about 7 months, the joey begins to take small adventures from mother, but not too far as they quickly seek safety in mother's pouch if alarmed. At 10 months they are usually weaned from mother.